Yōkan

Sabine MarcelisKawatsura Shikki

A series of two tables with a voluminous design and a wall-mounted piece, all lacquered in Kawatsura Shikki's style. Inspired by the interplay of light and materiality, the three distinct objects were crafted, each intersected with a singular gesture that manipulates the light captured on its surface, inviting viewers to explore from every angle. Stripped down to the essentials and punctuated with a single twist or inverted slice, attention is solely drawn to the lacquerware itself. (Material: Wood, Urushi (Lacquer) / Size: Coffe Table S | L53 x W53 x H45 cm, Coffe Table L | L97 x W120 x H40 cm, Wall Art | L6 x W80 x H160 cm)

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About Kawatsure Shikki

Kawatsura Shikki is lacquerware that was born in Yuzawa City, Akita Prefecture. It originated in sword sheaths, bows, armours and other weapons lacquered at this place about 800 years ago. Today its main products are bowls and plates. The manufacturing process is performed in the order of wood making, grounding, painting, and decoration. A high-strength vessel is made by the unique ground coating in which raw lacquer is applied over and over again.

Designer

Sabine Marcelis

Artist/Designer. After graduating Design Academy Eindhoven in 2011, she founded Studio Sabine Marcelis, working within the fields of product, installation and spatial design with a strong focus on materiality. Her works have been acquired into world-renowned museums, and she has also created commissioned work for many fashion houses.

5 Questions to the Designer

Japanese Artisan

Keita Sato

Representative Director of Sato Shoji Co., Ltd. A traditional craft with a history spanning over 800 years since the Kamakura period, Kawatsura lacquerware from Yuzawa City, Akita Prefecture. Sato Shoji is a leading company preserving the history of Kawatsura lacquerware, actively engaging in initiatives such as overseas expansion to cities like London, Paris, Monaco, collaborations with designers and brands, all aimed at bridging tradition to the future.

5 Questions to the Japanese Artisan